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What is BIM? (Building Information Modelling) – NBS National BIM Library

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This video helps with the question: ‘What is BIM’?

http://www.nationalBIMlibrary.com is the construction industry’s free-to-use resource of NBS standard BIM content. Objects are available in IFC, ArchiCAD, Bentley, Revit and Vectoworks format.

NBS National BIM Library content links with manufacturer content such as maintenance literature and CPD. It also links to the UK specification system NBS.

For more information on BIM please see http://www.thenbs.com/BIM

For more information on BIM objects please see http://www.nationalbimlibrary.com

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Top 10 BIM Acronyms Explained | The B1M

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BIM is an acronym for the building information modelling process, but you’ve probably realised that within that process there are many more acronyms lurking around to confuse you! Here, The B1M’s Co-Founder Tom Payne counts down the 10 most common ones, helpfully taking you through the basics of BIM at the same time.

10 – PAS 1192: “Publically Available Specification 1192”, a series published by the British Standards Institution. There are five parts to it, with parts two to five each describing a different aspect of BIM Level 2. The key part for project delivery is PAS 1192-2.

9 – CDE: “Common Data Environment”, a shared digital space online that everyone in your project team has access to. It could be a server, an extranet or a cloud based system.

8 – PIM // AIM: Within the BIM process, project teams create information models in their common data environment using both graphical and non-graphical data, clearly structured and accurately linked. That data builds in richness as the project stages progress until handover where the complete data set is passed to the asset’s owner or end-user. The information model is called a “Project Information Model” or PIM during the delivery phase, and an “Asset Information Model” or AIM once a project is handed over and complete.

7 – EIR: “Employer’s Information Requirements”. Right at the outset, Clients or Employers set out the information they will require in this document. It will state what they need at key stages of the project to make decisions, and what they’ll need at handover to operate their new asset at an optimum level. It’s important that this document is in place so project teams know what graphical and non-graphical information is needed, and when.

6 – BIM EP: “BIM Execution Plan”. It’s a document shared and agreed by all parties in the project team. It sets outs how they will work together through the BIM process to deliver the requirements of the EIRs. BIM Execution Plans will typically detail: team roles and responsibilities; deliverables, and the timescales associated with them; approval procedures, and; logistics, formats and conventions for interoperable file sharing. This is by no means an exhaustive list.

5 – MIDP: “Master Information Delivery Plan”. This is a document that’s developed from the BIM Execution Plan, setting out what information needs to be delivered, the format is should be delivered in, the timescales and who needs to produce it. Below an MIDP sit various Task Information Delivery Plans (TIDPs) which all feed into the master document.

4 – LOI: “Level of Information” or the amount of non-graphical data within an information model at a given stage. It might be formed of schedules, specifications or other 2D documentation.

3 – LOD: “Level of Detail” and describes the amount of graphical or 3D data within an information model at any given point in a project. Collectively, Levels of Detail and Levels of Information and termed “Levels of Definition”.

2 – IFC: “Industry Foundation Classes”. It’s the open and neutral file format for exchanging data, and was developed by a global organisation called BuildingSMART. IFC is like an international language that everyone speaks, so that – regardless of what software platform they’re using – information can be openly exchanged. Most software platforms will have an IFC export function or the ability to save data in IFC format.

1 – BIM:

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BIM Protocol Explained | The B1M

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It’s possibly one of the dullest documents you’re ever going to read, but the BIM Protocol does do some important things for building information modelling (BIM) projects. This 3 minute video with The B1M’s Fred Mills summarises what the BIM Protocol is, how it works and how to use it, in a clear and easy format.

The BIM Protocol was developed by the United Kingdom’s (UK) Construction Industry Council. It’s a standardised supplementary legal agreement that can be incorporated into professional service appointments and construction contracts by a simple amendment. There are two parts at the end that you edit to make it specific to your project.

The Protocol’s key objective is to enable the production of information models at defined stages of a project. It also supports collaborative working, requires the appointment of an Information Manager and enables common standards or working practices to be made an explicit contractual requirement.

The BIM Protocol creates additional obligations and rights for the Employer and the contracted Party or Parties. It’s based on the direct contractual relationship between the Employer and the Supplier. It doesn’t cater for any rights or liabilities between different Suppliers. Where a Supplier is dependent on another (or on a Sub-Consultant or Sub-Contractor) to fulfil their obligations, those conditions need to be reflected in the agreements made between them.

It’s important that everyone producing or delivering information models on a project has the BIM Protocol appended to their contracts. This ensures that everyone follows the same standards and ways of working and has the clear right to do so. Responsibility for ensuring that the Protocol is in place rests with the Employer.

As we mentioned above, there are two editable appendices at the end of the Protocol that you use to make the standardised document relevant to your project:

1. Model Production and Delivery Table: This must include references to all building information models that are required by the Employer at each stage of the project.

2. Information Requirements: These should detail the information management standards that will be adopted on your project.

The template Protocol helpfully includes some example entries in these appendices to guide you.

When using the BIM Protocol, you need to be mindful that:

1. The same version of the document and its appendices are incorporated into each contract.

2. The wording is not amended (save for within the appendices).

3. All information models to be produced (by each Party contracted to the Employer on the project) are listed.

4. Any changes are treated as Contract Variations.

You also need to remember that the BIM Protocol was developed as a means of amending existing forms of contract for use on BIM Level 2 projects. It works to a point at Level 2 but the industry is likely to have to fundamentally re-consider how it contracts as it progresses to BIM Level 3 and as work flows are digitised further.

You can download a template BIM Protocol from the Construction Industry Council and learn more about how it can be implemented on projects here: http://www.bimtaskgroup.org/bim-protocol/

This video contains extracts of the UK Construction Industry Council’s BIM Protocol. © Construction Industry Council.

For more BIM videos subscribe now – http://ow.ly/GxW7y

The B1M is the definitive video channel for building information modelling (BIM). We want to inspire a million people through our videos to help mobilise BIM adoption around the world.

View this video and more at http://www.TheB1M.com
Follow us on Twitter – http://www.twitter.com/TheB1M
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We welcome you sharing our content to inspire others, but please be nice and play by our rules: http://www.theb1m.com/guidelines-for-sharing

Our content may only be embedded onto third party websites by arrangement. We have established partnerships with domains to share our content and help it reach a wider audience. If you are interested in partnering with us please contact Enquiries@TheB1M.com.

Ripping and/or editing this video is illegal and will result in legal action.

© 2016 The B1M Limited | Share + Inspire

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What Happens If I Don’t Do BIM? | The B1M

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For all the noise and mandates, nobody is going to force you to adopt building information modelling (BIM). If you want to, you can just carry on as you are and tune out from all the jargon. But what will happen if you don’t do BIM? Here The B1M’s Co-Founder Fred Mills explores the impacts for individuals and the organisations they work for…

What Will Happen to Me?

“For the first few days, you’ll barely notice it” says Fred. “You might even feel like a huge weight has been lifted from your shoulders. You’ll be able to get on with things without worrying about BIM all the time. But then it will start to get you”.

As others around you start to adopt BIM, you might feel that you’re just not as efficient as you used to be. Your peers will notably start designing better buildings, doing faster take-offs, more accurate programmes and finding information more quickly in a common data environment (CDE).

Whilst the repercussions for individuals are tough, people tend to be shielded by the organisations that they work for. “Unfortunately the fate awaiting those organisations themselves is far more brutal” explains Fred.

What Will Happen to My Organisation?

Things will start to bite as your competitors adopt BIM and a digital approach to construction across their projects and almost every part of their business. They will become more efficient by being able to find accurate data, faster, in a single shared online area and from being able to make decisions on that data that are right first time.

Some studies (such as Avanti: http://www.cpic.org.uk/en/publications/avanti) have estimated that adopting BIM could generate efficiency savings of 20-25%. In a five day working week, 20% represents an entire day. Those that realise these efficiency savings are effectively gaining an extra day in every week of their financial years. That time will allow them to take on more work whilst keeping their cost base the same, increasing their turnover and their profit.

With that foundation, they will be able to increase their market share, whilst investing in development and in building and retaining excellent teams of people. They will steadily become the first choice for clients because they’re able to offer a better value project on a more efficient timescale at a more attractive price. For those not adopting BIM or going digital, this is will all prove very hard to compete with.

Fred paints a powerful picture by setting out the implications for businesses across a typical working day, but is quick to stress the purpose of doing so: “Scaring people is patronising and not helpful and that isn’t what we’ve tried to do with this video. We just want to help you visualise what will happen if let you the environment around you change without seriously considering what you need to do to keep up”.

To get started with BIM check out the clear, straight-forward and impartial videos on our free BIM for Beginners playlist (here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEmWzqc0D6MicUIp_jTojEySfQOpGYDrD). If you’re already on board but know others struggling to understand the relevance of BIM or where to start… send them our way!

Spanish sub-titles by Iria Carreira.

For more BIM videos subscribe now – http://ow.ly/GxW7y

The B1M is the definitive video resource for building information modelling (BIM). We want to inspire a million people through our videos to help mobilise BIM adoption around the world.

View this video and more at http://www.TheB1M.com
Follow us on Twitter – http://www.twitter.com/TheB1M
Like us on Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/TheB1M
Follow us on Linkedin – https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-…
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We welcome you sharing our content to inspire others, but please be nice and play by our rules: http://www.theb1m.com/guidelines-for-sharing

Our content may only be embedded onto third party websites by arrangement. We have established partnerships with domains to share our content and help it reach a wider audience. If you are interested in partnering with us please contact Enquiries@TheB1M.com.

Ripping and/or editing this video is illegal and will result in legal action.

© 2015 The B1M Limited | Share + Inspire

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What is 6D BIM? | The B1M

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What is 6D BIM and how can it add value to projects delivered through a building information modelling (BIM) environment? Fred Mills, Co-Founder of The B1M, explains the terminology and potential benefits for both the delivery and operational phases of a built asset’s lifecycle.

For those coming into the topic cold, Fred starts with a quick re-cap on what BIM itself actually means. In simple terms, he describes it as the process of creating information models or data sets formed of graphical and non-graphical information in a shared digital space known as a Common Data Environment (CDE). The information builds in richness as the project stages progress until the complete data set is handed over to the client at completion.

As you create an information model, you can add scheduling data to different components, generating accurate programme data for your project; a process known as 4D BIM. The next step is to produce accurate cost estimates from the components and it’s this process that is known as 5D BIM (explained further here: http://www.theb1m.com/video/what-is-5d-bim). Taking it a step further, 6D BIM is the linking of attribute data to support Facilities Management (FM).

That data could include details about the components manufacturer, when it was installed, the necessary maintenance that it requires and when, how to operate it at its optimum level to enhance performance or conserve energy, and its expected lifespan. “Once linked into the information model, 6D data can support decision making during the design process and the operation of the built asset once it’s in use” explains Fred.

At delivery phase, it enables design teams to consider their impact of their proposals over a built asset’s lifecycle, simulating outcomes and anticipated costs. But the ultimate value, lies in the use of that data to support the operational phase.

At handover, project teams can pass their complete data set (known as an Asset Information Model or AIM from that point) over to the end-user. The digital model offers them a more controlled, accessible and easily navigable way of managing their information. “It’s much more practical than the bundles of lever arch folders that are handed over traditionally” says Fred.

With this data on maintenance, lifespans and energy performance to hand, operators can determine the costs of those activities and create spend profiles over a built asset’s life, pre-planning maintenance activities years in advance. It helps them adopt a completely planned and pro-active approach to FM and operation as opposed to a reactive one when unexpected events and costs can crop up at any moment.

Where maintenance does occur, or where an asset is extended, refurbished or re-modelled, operators can update the information model with the relevant points about that event.

For the significant value 6D can bring to the operational phase, Fred describes the availability of that data when designing future buildings as “construction’s Holy Grail”, enabling design teams to hone their proposals based on real in-use data.

He ends by suggesting that those outside of the industry looking in would be stunned by the widespread – though not unanimous – focus on capital costs. Fred believes this is a symptom of procurement and tendering practices that reward the price for capital delivery as opposed to long term, whole life value. “If that sounds shocking and total madness in the context of what I’ve just explained in this video… well you’re right” he says.

In the United Kingdom (UK), the British Standards Institution’s PAS 1192-3: 2013 covers the process of managing a built asset in the operational phase using BIM. You can download a free copy (here: http://shop.bsigroup.com/forms/pass/pas-1192-3/) or watch

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Being The Best BIM Manager

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Scott Chatterton presents how to be the

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What is a

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Fred Mills, Co-Founder of The B1M, explains what a BIM model is – and what it is not – in this easily digestible 3 minute video! “Whatever your role in the construction industry, you’ve probably heard people talking about BIM models” he acknowledges. “The acronym BIM stands for Building Information Modelling. That’s a process and a way of working, not a physical object or entity”.

Within a building information modelling process, project teams contribute information and data about a proposed building or structure in a shared digital space known as a Common Data Environment (CDE). This enables all parties to access it to develop and co-ordinate their respective contributions. You can learn more about CDEs in this 3 minute video: http://www.theb1m.com/video/what-is-a-common-data-environment

The digital information contributed could include specifications, schedules, performance requirements, programmes, cost plans and drawings. Those drawings are created in 3D by different members of the project team in private ‘work-in-progress’ areas. They are then put together into one 3D model to check that they co-ordinate, before being shared with the wider project team.

The non-graphical information (specifications, schedules etc) is linked to the graphical 3D model. When you explore and click on different parts of the 3D representation, you’ll be able to access the information about it. Clicking on a light for example might give you information on its manufacturer, lead-time, cost, performance level and when it will need replacing. The same approach can work vice versa, where clicking an item in the non-graphical information will take you to its location in the 3D representation.

The complete suite of documents is known as a data set or information model. When you hear people say ‘BIM model’ this is what they mean, ‘a building information model’. The graphical parts, when not linked or supported by data in a CDE are 3D models.

The key difference with a building information modelling approach – as opposed to traditional ways of working – is that information is clearly structured and easier to find in one place. “That enables project teams to deliver higher quality buildings, more efficiently and end users to really understand how their built assets are performing” explains Fred. “They can then improve that performance to directly impact business outcomes and the wider social outcomes of the world we all live in”

He concludes with a simple call to action: “If you know someone who’s still doing it the old way… share this video with them”.

This video was kindly sponsored by 4Projects. Find out more about them here: http://www.4projects.com/

Spanish sub-titles provided by Iria Carreira (https://twitter.com/iriacarreira).

You can learn more about building information modelling in PAS 1192-2, which is available as a free download from the British Standards Institution here: http://shop.bsigroup.com/forms/pass/pas-1192-2. This video contains an extract of PAS 1192-2: 2013, © 2013 The British Standards Institution, © 2013 Mervyn Richards OBE and © 2013 Mark Bew MBE. Model imagery courtesy of InteliBuild: http://www.intelibuild.com/

For more BIM videos subscribe now – http://ow.ly/GxW7y

The B1M is the definitive video resource for building information modelling (BIM). We want to inspire a million people through our videos to help mobilise BIM adoption around the world.

View this video and more at http://www.TheB1M.com
Follow us on Twitter – http://www.twitter.com/TheB1M
Like us on Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/TheB1M
Follow us on Linkedin – https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-…
B1M pictures on – http://instagram.com/theb1m/

We welcome you sharing our content to inspire others, but please be nice and play by our rules: http://www.theb1m.com/guidelines-for-sharing

Our content may only be embedded onto third party websites by arrangement. We have established partnerships with domains to share our content and help it reach a wider audience. If you are interested in partnering with us please contact Enquiries@TheB1M.com.

Ripping and/or editing this video is illegal and will result in legal action.

© 2015 The B1M Limited | Share + Inspire

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Introduction to BIM – B1M University Class 1

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What is Building Information Modelling (BIM)? Find out in Class 1 of our B1M University series, hosted by James Daniel at University of Westminster. For more BIM videos from The B1M subscribe now – http://ow.ly/GxW7y
Watch

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What is BIM?

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Bimplicity’s definition of BIM

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What is BIM?

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A video produced by Devenney Group Architects, with model clips courtesy of Tekla International. The video describes BIM, or Building Information Modeling, how it is being used, and a few of the many benefits of using the BIM process. For more information on BIM and how Devenney Group Architects is using the process, please visit www.devenneygroup.com